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Chemistry Education 2020

About Conference


Chemistry Education 2020, the conference more discussed and focused on Chemistry Education, Chemistry Research and Interface. Organic Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Materials Chemistry, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Theoretical and Computational Chemistry and many more.

Chemistry Education 2020 will serve the global community in the development and distribution of valuable information. It aims to support global research communities by empowering clusters of scientists to regularly meet and discuss topics with front runners in the field. This conference covers important and relatively broad subject areas in the fields of Chemistry Education and Research.

Chemistry Education 2020 furnishing an opportunity for speakers, moderators from all over the world to fulfil their ideas and innovative research ideas in chemistry. It is also an opportunity for researchers, chemistry professors, students to present and discuss the most recent advances and challenges on Chemistry Education and Chemistry Research. Moreover, the Best Poster award and Best speaker awards will be distributed by the Chair and co-chair of the session.

 

Welcome Message

Conferenceseries LLC cordially invites participants from all over the world to attend 3rd International Conference on Chemistry Education and Research, scheduled during November 18-19, 2020, Singapore theme of  “Innovations and Research Applications in Chemistry”.

  • Chemistry Association
  • Chemistry Societies
  • Chemistry Researchers
  • Chemistry Students
  • Chemistry Scientists
  • Directors of Chemistry companies
  • Chemistry Engineers
  • Physicists/Chemists
  • Exhibitors
  • Industry Investors
  • Materials Chemists/Research Professors
  • Junior/Senior research fellows of Chemistry
  • Directors, Deans and Head of the departments in Chemistry and its related fields
  • Professors, Assistant and Associate professors of Chemistry and its related fields
  • Delegates from various Pharma and instrumental companies
  • Laboratory Chemists
  • Polymer companies
  • Others

 

Sessions/Tracks

Track 1: Chemistry Education

Chemistry Education is therefore the systematic process of acquiring the fundamental knowledge about the universe. With this indispensable knowledge richly acquired, man can shape and reshape his world for his benefit. Hence, the development of the nation is usually measured by the degree and extent of growth brought to it through the enterprise of science education and a gate way to it is chemistry education. Chemistry education is the vehicle through which chemical knowledge and skill reach the people who are in need of capacities and potentials for development. In addition, chemical education addresses the social objective of substance development as education is now of the primary means for empowerment, participation, cultural preservation, social mobility and equity.

  •  Developing theories Science and math ability
  • Conduct research Perseverance
  • Attending to data Analytical skills
  • Curiosity Follow through skills
  • Utilizing formulas Perform experiments
  • Process data Observation and decision making
  • Work independently and in groups Technological skills
  • Oral and written communication Remain objective

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 2: Chemistry of surfaces and interfaces

Advances in nanofabrication technologies are fueling the increasing interest in well-controlled multilayered thin films or nanocomposites. The unique properties of surfaces and interfaces, particularly between materials with dissimilar properties, can lead to new and improved multifunctional properties. However, the complexity of interfaces and the difficulty to study buried structures, makes it difficult to unravel the correlation between the interfaces and the enhanced properties of these materials, resulting in slowing down the progress towards advanced applications and devices. Thus, this Symposium is aimed at bringing together experts in the different aspects of “Surfaces and Interfaces of in Multilayered Thin Films and Nano-composites” ranging from fabrication and characterization, to devices.

  • Novel technologies to fabricate nano-materials
  • New approaches to study buried interfaces
  • Multifunctional materials
  • Interface-based new or enhanced properties
  • Materials for electronics
  • Proximity effects
  • Organic/inorganic interfaces
  • Interfaces between 2D materials
  • Interfaces involving topologically protected states.

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 3: Nanochemistry

Nanochemistry is the combination of chemistry and nanoscience. Nanochemistry is associated with synthesis of building blocks which are dependent on size, surface, shape and defect properties. Nanochemistry is being used in chemical, materials and physical, science as well as engineering, biological and medical applications. Nanochemistry and other nanoscience fields have the same core concepts but the usages of those concepts are different. Nanochemistry can be characterized by concepts of size, shape, self-assembly, defects and bio-nano; So the synthesis of any new nano-construct is associated with all these concepts. Nano-construct synthesis is dependent on how the surface, size and shape will lead to self-assembly of the building blocks into the functional structures; they probably have functional defects and might be useful for electronic, photonic, medical or bioanalytical problems.

  • Environmental science
  • Biology
  • Medicine
  • Product development and support
  • Chemical engineering

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 4: Materials Chemistry

Materials Chemistry is the section of Materials Science and Engineering that investigates the chemical nature of materials. This is a fast-growing and highly interdisciplinary area with very flexible boundaries. The diverse nature of materials arises from their atomic composition and their complex molecular structures, which are organised over many different length scales. The resulting intricate micro- and nanostructures lead to striking physical properties, such as electrical, optical and mechanical behaviour, which are of both scientific and technological importance. Such materials range from the everyday (concrete, glass, aluminium) to those used in aerospace, microelectronics and medicine.

Materials chemistry impacts on a wide range of societal challenges including:

  • Communications and information technology
  • Advanced manufacturing
  • Materials efficiency
  • Environment and climate change
  • Healthcare
  • Biotechnology
  • Renewable and sustainable energy

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 5: Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry

Analytical chemistry is the process of isolating specific compounds, identifying those compounds, and determining how much of the compounds are in a product. Analytical chemistry is used in many different areas of science. It can be used to determine how much cholesterol is in your blood, to identify an unknown compound found at a crime scene, or to purify the oil you put into your car.

  • Elemental analysis
  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Membrane separation

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 6: Environmental & Green Chemistry

Environmental chemistry is the study of chemical processes occurring in the environment which are impacted by humankind's activities. These impacts may be felt on a local scale, through the presence of urban cities' air pollutants or toxic substances arising from a chemical waste site, or on a global scale, through depletion of stratospheric ozone or global warming.  Green chemistry is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, use, and ultimate disposal. Green chemistry is also known as sustainable chemistry.

  • Aquatic Chemistry
  • Atmospheric Chemistry
  • Chemistry of the Biosphere and Toxicological Chemistry
  •  Chemistry of the Geosphere and Soil
  • Chemistry of the Anthrosphere within a Framework of Industrial Ecology

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 7: Catalysis and high pressure chemistry

Catalyzed reactions are typically used to accelerate the rate by which a specific chemistry proceeds. Essentially, the action of the catalyst is to provide an alternative, lower energy pathway for the reaction.  For this to occur, the catalytic substance interacts with a reactant and forms an intermediate compound. This intermediate is transient in that after it forms, it breaks apart leaving the original catalyst species unchanged. A catalyst is not affected by the reaction as far as the chemical structure or mass at reaction completion.

  • Heterogeneous Catalyzed Reaction 
  • Homogeneous Catalyzed Reaction 

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 8: Macrocyclic and heterocyclic chemistry

In chemistry, a macrocyclic ligand is a macrocycle with a ring size of at least nine (including all hetero atoms) and three or more donor sites. Classic examples are crown ethers and porphyrins. Macrocyclic ligands exhibit particularly high affinity for metal ions. Heterocyclic compound, also called heterocycle, any of a major class of organic chemical compounds characterized by the fact that some or all of the atoms in their molecules are joined in rings containing at least one atom of an element other than carbon (C). The cyclic part (from Greek kyklos, meaning “circle”) of heterocyclic indicates that at least one ring structure is present in such a compound, while the prefix hetero- (from Greek heteros, meaning “other” or “different”) refers to the noncarbon atoms, or heteroatoms, in the ring. In their general structure, heterocyclic compounds resemble cyclic organic compounds that incorporate only carbon atoms in the rings.

  • Three-membered rings
  • Four-membered rings
  • Five-membered rings with one heteroatom
  • Sulphur containing macrocycles
  • Nitrogen-containing macrocyclic compounds
  • Oxygen-containing macrocyclic compounds

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 9: Organic Chemistry

Organic Materials Chemistry is a major area of research which leads to the development of advanced organic and polymeric materials by investigating into the process of synthesis, processing, control, characterization and establishment of the structural properties relationship among these materials. Nomenclature to the compounds was given based on the chemical structure and isomerism was observed in relation to the radical displacement of atoms within the structures. Structural chemistry involves the determination of structure of compounds using various instrumental techniques. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are materials in which metal-to-organic ligand interactions yield porous coordination networks with record-setting surface areas surpassing activated carbons and zeolites. De-localization of orbitals within the complex substances form conjugated systems of materials which lead to the derivation of chromophores used in synthetic processes. Diamond and carbon materials are widely used in the applications of organic synthesis from novel materials.

  • Nomenclature and isomerism
  • Metal-organic frameworks
  • Resonating organic materials
  • Conjugated systems and chromophores

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 10: Inorganic Chemistry

Organic materials are used for made wood furniture, feathers, leather, and synthetic materials such as petroleum-based plastics. Functional properties were studied, and related structural applications will be considered to play a key role. Inorganic Materials Chemistry includes the study of metallic or non-metallic properties. Metals are materials holding or possessing the characteristics of metals. Non – metals are materials they are not possessing.

  • Metals and non-metals
  • Liquid crystals
  • Lithium-ion batteries
  • Inorganic nanotubes
  • Stoichiometry and gravimetry

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 11: Geochemistry

Geochemistry studies the origin, evolution and distribution of chemical elements on Earth which are contained in the rock-forming minerals and the products derived from it, as well as in living beings, water and atmosphere. One of the goals of geochemistry is to determine the abundance of elements in nature, as this information is essential to hypotheses development about the origin and structure of our planet and the universe.

  • High temperature petrology and geochemistry
  • Low-temperature geochemistry

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 12: Cluster Chemistry

In chemistry, a cluster is an ensemble of bound atoms or molecules that is intermediate in size between a molecule and a bulk solid. In another definition a cluster compound contains a group of two or more metal atoms where direct and substantial metal bonding is present. The main cluster types are "naked" clusters (without stabilizing ligands) and those with ligands. For transition metal clusters, typical stabilizing ligands include carbon monoxide, halides, isocyanides, alkenes, and hydrides. For main group elements, typical clusters are stabilized by hydride ligands.

  • Fail-Over Clusters
  • Scalable High Performance Clusters
  • Application Clusters
  • Network Load balancing clusters

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 13: Organometallic chemistry

Organometallic chemistry is the study of organometallic compounds, chemical compounds containing at least one chemical bond between a carbon atom of an organic molecule and a metal, including alkaline, alkaline earth, and transition metals, and sometimes broadened to include metalloids like boron, silicon, and tin, as well. Aside from bonds to organyl fragments or molecules, bonds to 'inorganic' carbon, like carbon monoxide (metal carbonyls), cyanide, or carbide, are generally considered to be organometallic as well. Some related compounds such as transition metal hydrides and metal phosphine complexes are often included in discussions of organometallic compounds, though strictly speaking, they are not necessarily organometallic.

  • ligand dissociation/ligand association
  • reductive elimination/oxidative addition
  • σ bond metathesis/4-centered reaction
  • insertion/de-insertion
  • Lewis acid activation of electrophile

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 14: Theoretical and computational chemistry

Theoretical chemistry is the branch of chemistry which develops theoretical generalizations that are part of the theoretical arsenal of modern chemistry. The term computational chemistry is usually used when a mathematical method is sufficiently well developed that it can be automated for implementation on a computer. Computational chemistry is the application of chemical, mathematical and computing skills to the solution of interesting chemical problems. It uses computers to generate information such as properties of molecules or simulated experimental results. Very few aspects of chemistry can be computed exactly, but almost every aspect of chemistry has been described in a qualitative or approximate quantitative computational scheme.

  • Theoretical Chemical Kinetics
  • Molecular Modelling
  • Molecular Mechanics
  • Cheminformatics
  • Molecular Dynamics
  • Mathematical Chemistry
  • Theoretical Chemistry Advances and Perspectives
  • Chemical Dynamics
  • Quantum Mechanics
  • Theoretical Experimental Chemistry

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 15: Polymer Chemistry

Polymer chemistry is a sub-discipline of chemistry that focuses on the chemical synthesis, structure, chemical and physical properties of polymers and macromolecules. The principles and methods used within polymer chemistry are also applicable through a wide range of other chemistry sub-disciplines like organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and physical chemistry Many materials have polymeric structures, from fully inorganic metals and ceramics to DNA and other biological molecules, however, polymer chemistry is typically referred to in the context of synthetic, organic compositions. Synthetic polymers are ubiquitous in commercial materials and products in everyday use, commonly referred to as plastics, and rubbers, and are major components of composite materials.

  • Inorganic Polymer Synthesis
  • Biopolymer Synthesis
  • Polymers in medicine

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 16: Supramolecular Chemistry

Supramolecular chemistry as defined by Lehn ‘chemistry beyond the molecule’ focuses on the development of functional complex architectures through non-covalent interactions. Supramolecular chemistry is the domain of chemistry concerning chemical systems composed of a discrete number of molecules. ... Whereas traditional chemistry concentrates on the covalent bond, supramolecular chemistry examines the weaker and reversible non-covalent interactions between molecules.

  • Intermolecular Cooperativity
  • Intramolecular/Chelate Cooperativity
  • Interannular Cooperativity

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 17: Electrochemistry

The research in Electronic and Magnetic materials field unites the essential values of solid state physics and chemistry for manufacturing of materials science. Intermolecular interactions are also known as molecular interactions. Changes in molecular interactions involves in melting, unfolding, strand separation, boiling. The basic parameters of electronic and magnetic materials are rigid rotation and time dependence. This is related to the computer simulation method to identify the movements physically to interact with atoms and molecules for a given period in order to generate the system for evolution.

  • Film Dosimetry and Image Analysis
  • Electromagnetic radiation
  • Optical properties of metals and non-metals
  • Photoconductivity
  • Optical communications and networking
  • Lasers
  • Optical devices
  • Quantum science and technology

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 18: Physical chemistry

Physical chemistry is one of the traditional sub-disciplines of chemistry and is concerned with the application of the concepts and theories of physics to the analysis of the chemical properties and reactive behaviour of matter. While also at the interface between physics and chemistry, it is distinct from chemical physics. Physical chemistry, in contrast to chemical physics, is predominantly (but not always) a macroscopic or supra-molecular science, as the majority of the principles on which it was founded relate to the bulk rather than the molecular/atomic structure alone (for example, chemical equilibrium and colloids).

  • Biophysical Chemistry
  • Energy transfer
  • Electron transfer
  • Thermodynamics

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 19: Chemistry of proteins and lipids

Proteins are organic compounds that contain the element nitrogen as well as carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Proteins are the most diverse group of biologically important substances and are often considered to be the central compound necessary for life. In fact, the translation from the Greek root word means “first place.” Skin and muscles are composed of proteins; antibodies and enzymes are proteins; some hormones are proteins; and some proteins are involved with digestion, respiration, reproduction, and even normal vision, just to mention a few. Lipid is the collective name for fats, oils, waxes and fat-like molecules (such as steroids) found in the body. The basic unit of lipids is a triglyceride, synthesised from glycerol (propane-1,2,3-triol) and fatty acids.

  • Fatty acids
  • Esters
  • Phospholipids

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 20: Behavioral Research in Biochemistry

Biochemistry is the study of the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in live organisms. Biochemists focus heavily on the chemistry behind the role, function, and structure of biomolecules. The study of the chemistry behind biological processes defines the field of biochemistry. Biochemistry has become the foundation for understanding all biological processes. It has provided explanations for the causes of many diseases in humans, animals and plants.

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell biology
  • Metabolism
  • Genetics
  • Synthetic Biology

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 21: Biocomputing and Big Data in Chemical Research

Research chemicals are chemical substances used by scientists for medical and scientific research purposes. One characteristic of a research chemical is that it is for laboratory research use only; a research chemical is not intended for human or veterinary use. Research and development (R&D) consists of three main activities: basic research, applied research, and development. Basic research is where it all starts: new ideas, fundamental theories, unanswered questions, and investigation into something that doesn't quite make sense. The basic researcher is driven by curiosity and a desire to explore unknown territory. Some ideas pan out, some don't, and that is all part of the process. Basic research includes theoretical research, but it also includes early-stage investigations in the laboratory or field.

  • Pharmacological research chemicals
  • Agricultural research chemicals

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

Track 22Food and Medicinal Chemistry

Food chemistry is the study of chemical processes and interactions of all biological and non-biological components of foods. The biological substances include such items as meat, poultry, lettuce, beer, and milk as examples. It is similar to biochemistry in its main components such as carbohydrates, lipids, and protein, but it also includes areas such as water, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, food additives, flavors, and colors. This discipline also encompasses how products change under certain food processing techniques and ways either to enhance or to prevent them from happening. Medicinal chemistry or pharmaceutical chemistry is the chemistry discipline concerned with the design, development, and synthesis of pharmaceutical drugs. The discipline combines expertise from chemistry and pharmacology to identify, develop and synthesize chemical agents that have a therapeutic use and to evaluate the properties of existing drugs.

  • Carbohydrates
  • Lipids
  • Proteins
  • Computational chemistry
  • Click chemistry
  • Combinatorial chemistry

Societies:

Europe: European Chemical Sciences, Belgium; Society of Austrian Chemists, Austria; Royal Society of Chemistry, Belgium; Chemical Society of France, France; Society of German Scientists, Germany; Association of Greek Chemists, Greece; Association of Hungarian Chemists; Hungary; Italian Chemical Society, Italy; Polish Chemical Society, Poland; Portuguese Society of Chemistry, Portugal; Slovak Chemical Society, Slovakia; Swedish Chemical Society, Sweden; Swiss Chemical Society, Switzerland; Royal Dutch Chemical Society, The Netherlands; Norwegian Chemical Society, Norway.

USA: American Chemical Society; American Institute of Chemists; American Institute of Chemical Engineers; Association of Analytical Communities; Canadian Society for Chemical Technology (CSCT).

Asia-Pacific: Chemical Society of Japan; Chemical Research Society of India; Japan Association for International Chemical Information; the Korean Chemical Society; the Chemical Society of Thailand

 

Market Analysis

Chemical industry is a part of heavy industry sector. Chemicals are a broad chemical category including polymers, bulk petrochemicals and intermediates, other derivatives and basis industries and more. Adhesives & Sealants, paints, petrochemicals, plastics, specialty chemicals, substances all of these can be grouped in this category.

The Membranes Market is expected to grow from USD 5.4 billion in 2019 to USD 8.3 billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 9.0% during the forecast period. DuPont (US), Toray (Japan), Hydranautics (US), Koch Separation Solutions (US), and Pentair (UK) are some of the leading players with a substantial market share. New product launch, agreement & collaboration, investment & expansion, and merger & acquisition were the major growth strategies adopted by the market players between 2017 and 2020 to enhance their regional presence and meet the growing demand for membranes in the emerging economies.

Chemical production in the European Union is expected to barely grow faster than in 2016. In general, the increase in production will remain modest against the backdrop of a sluggish domestic market. We expect competitive pressure on export markets to remain intense, even though the naphtha-based European chemical industry benefits more from low oil prices than the gas-based production in the United States. Including non-EU countries, total European chemicals sales reached €615 billion in 2015, or 17.4 per cent of world output. In 2030 chemical production reach €6.3 trillion.

In 2015 Norway’s chemical, oil refining and pharmaceutical industry had sales of NOK 137.2 billion (€14.5 billion), of which NOK85.4 billion were exports (62.2%). The sector employed 14,000 full-time equivalents, and generated NOK 33 billion (€3.4 billion) of added value. Official statistics treat chemicals, oil refining and pharma as a single industry.

 

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Conference Date November 18-19, 2020

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